Aug. 22, 2008 – English 8, 10

Quick Review

  1. What is the subject of a sentence?  It’s the focus of the sentence and is either a noun or a noun equivalent.
      • The janitor cleaned the toilets at the school.
      1. What is the verb or verb phrase?  It’s the action that the subject is doing.
          • The janitor cleaned the toilets at the school.
          1. What is the direct object of a verb?  It is the noun or noun equivalent that completes a statement by answering the question of “what” or “whom” after the verb.
            • The janitor cleaned the toilets at the school.
          2. What is the indirect object of a verb?  It always precedes the direct object and says to whom or for whom an action was done. It is usually used with verbs of giving or communicating, such as bring, tell, show, offer, take, etc.
            • The woman gave the President a hug.

          Basic Sentence Structure: Linking Verbs

          Linking verbs, also called copula, is a word used to link the subject of a sentence, with its predicate.  Some examples are: was, were, is, are, will be, feel, felt, grow, become, appear, etc.

          Basic Sentence Structure: Complement

          A complement is a noun or an adjective that follows (comes after) the linking verb in the predicate, relating to the subject of the sentence. When the word used is a noun, the complement is called a predicate noun.  When it is an adjective, it is called a predicate adjective.  It is possible and common to have more than one complement in a sentence.:

          …..S……..LV…………………..C

          Eva Peron was an influential woman in Argentina. [predicate noun]

          …..S…….LV…………..C……………C

          Tomatoes are actually fruits not vegetables. [predicate nouns]

          …….S…………LV……………..C

          Mario Cuomo sounded a little angry. [predicate adjective]

          …………S…………….LV……….C

          The liberal arts always seem beleaguered. [predicate adjective]

          Advertisements

          Leave a Reply

          Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

          WordPress.com Logo

          You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

          Google photo

          You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

          Twitter picture

          You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

          Facebook photo

          You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

          Connecting to %s

          %d bloggers like this: